ABC’s of Championship Thinking in the Workplace

Closeup of message stones on white background.

A — Avoid assumptions, have an amazing attitude. Show appreciation for the people you work with on a regular basis.
B — Be yourself. Do not be the imitation of someone else.
C — Clarify your wishes, deliver clear, concise communication, commit to your growth
D — Design and Delight in your Destiny, be determined, use due diligence to get all the facts
E — Educate yourself, give no “excuses”
F — Face your fears, Focus on your future, Forgive
G — Adopt a “Good to Great” philosophy, Goals should be twofold: DO goals that will change and BE goals that will remain timeless since these are heart and soul goals. Businesses have DO and BE goals and we should have DO and BE goals as well.
H — stay Healthy by developing a good wellness plan
I — Inspire, improve, become interdependent by helping others grow by releasing the control brought on by independence.
J — “Jump” at the challenges offered. Here is a saying of some advice given to young American Indians at the moment of their initiation.
“As you go the way of life, you will see a great chasm. JUMP it is not as wide as you think.”
K — Become a “key” employee. Remember the story of “Karate Kid” and how Miyagi portrays Karate as the challenge on taking yourself on from beginning to end, top to bottom, to rethink every aspect of you, and that Karate is not just a form of protection. He had to find out Daniel’s commitment level with a series of tasks including the famous wax on, wax off. No matter what we chose to do, Karate Kid Kommitment (pardon the use of the K, kouldn’t help it) means not walking down the middle of the road. Commitment is either yes you do it or no, you do not but there isn’t any guess so about it.
L & M — This is the LESS of and MORE of: Less negative energy, more positive energy, Less talking, more listening, Less individual, more team.
N — Networks. Highly effective people work in networks, relying on the right people for the right reasons at the right times. We are innately social people so networking is right up our alley.
O — Overcome obstacles. It takes extra effort to be “outstanding”.
P — Be professional, persist over problems, there is power in positive interactions. Research has found that marriages are much more likely to succeed when the couple experiences a 5 to 1 ratio of positive to negative interactions. Additional research also shows that workgroups with positive to negative interaction ratios greater than 3 to 1 are significantly more productive than teams that do not reach this ratio. So what does this mean for you and me? For most of us it means we need to increase the number of positive interactions we have at home and at work and reduce our negative interactions. We need to engage each other with more smiles, kind words, encouragement, gratitude, meaningful conversations, honest dialogues and sincere positive interactions. And to foster these actions we need to create personal and team rituals that help us interact more positively. If we make them part of our organizational process and individual habits they are more likely to happen.
Q — Be a person of Quality.
R — Risk, it is worth it!! Understand that life and decisions carry some measure of risk with it but without moving ahead, we run the risk of standing still.
S — “Solve” the problem, find the “Solution”. Solutions are always out there.
T — Try, try, try….Be truthful.
U — Be Un-equal. We can decide to be average and equal or become above average and unequal.
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For Returning Veterans: 7 Myths and Realities of Organizations

Watch-your-thoughtsAfter 9/11, many men and women volunteered for military duty and as a nation, we are ever so grateful for their service. Now that most are coming home after many months or years of service abroad, combat duty and/or recovering from injuries, transitioning from military life to civilian life is not easy. The cultures are different and many veterans have a hard time getting jobs and keeping them because the military way of doing things doesn’t always apply or function in the civilian work environment.

We at Dynamic Worldwide have partnered with Major General Carl Schneider (Retired) to help returning veterans transition into the civilian work environment. We are offering this course free of charge to any veteran in the Phoenix valley no matter what their situation is. Here is a little tidbit of what the course covers:

 

The 7 Myths and Realities of Organizations:

Myth #1: If you work hard and “keep your nose clean” the company “will take care of you.” By “will take care of you” we mean that you’ll be considered for promotions, special training programs and job assignments that will bring you visibility.

REALITY: A company or organization is an “It” – an entity doesn’t make decisions of policy, procedures, promotions, etc. The people running the entity do. And there are few of those, but many non-management employees. A boss once said:

“Hard work will not guarantee success. Not working hard will likely guarantee failure.”

Myth #2: There is a “perfect” job.

REALITY: There is what appears to be the perfect job. This is akin to “the grass is always greener on the other side.” The problem is, you still have to mow it. What may seem to be the perfect position in another company or department, may not always stay that way. People leave, they get promoted and the situations change, sometimes from one day to another. How can you prepare for the “unexpected”? You can’t. Continue to work hard and control your expectations. Learn all you can about your job, the company and what’s expected of you.

Myth #3: You can be successful without good people skills.

REALITY:

  1. Not easily done. No matter who you are, at one point in your career, you’ll have deal with people to be successful.
  2. People rarely fall for lack of technical skills. Instead, it’s the lack of skill in knowing how to deal effectively with other people where most failures occur. One must be tolerant of differences, control opinions, have empathy, be supportive and respectful.

Myth #4: Understanding corporate and individual unit culture is not important.

REALITY: Accurately reading and understanding the culture of an organization is critical to career success.

Myth #5: To be successful, I don’t need to understand or participate in the organization’s politics.

REALITY: Yes, you do. Politics are a part of all organizations no matter what type they are – both negative and positive politics.

Myth #6: Positive visibility is not important to career success.

REALITY: Positive visibility is a must.

Positive visibility is the ability to behave and complete your work in such a way that sets you apart from others in a positive manner and gets you recognized.

  • Communications skills – speaking, writing and listening
  • Human relations skills
  • Acquire knowledge – about your job, the company, culture, people, problems, competitors, company priorities
  • Sets you apart from those who don’t have them
  • Adds to your skill base
  • Prepares you for opportunities and assignments that require them
  • Builds self-confidence

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